1. Globaloria Students Win 1st Place at 2009 West Virginia Flash Animation Festival
  2. Change from the Classroom Up: Globaloria Educators Share Stories of Innovation
  3. Globaloria Impact Research Presented at AERA

1. Globaloria Students Win 1st Place at 2009 West Virginia Flash Animation Festival

Learn the Bones - an original game by Globaloria students Emily and Courtney at the Randolph Technical Center in Elkins, West Virginia - won first place in the high school category of this year’s West Virginia Flash Animation Festival at West Liberty University. Emily and Courtney developed Learn the Bones because they “wanted children to have a fun, interactive way to learn the scientific names of bones and their location in the body.” “These girls not only developed an original and engaging educational web game,” commented their teacher Denise Stalnaker, “they are also breaking our local stereotypes that gaming is primarily for ‘techies’ or ‘gamers’, who are typically boys. These girls are paving the way for a change!”


Game makers Courtney and Emily

Learn the Bones game screen

 

2. Change from the Classroom Up: Globaloria Educators Share Stories of Innovation


Denise working with her students

How does education need to change to inspire students in the new knowledge economy? Can new computational tools and digital design projects help educators engage today’s students? Will teachers accept new ideas and thrive in complex programs? These are important questions being discussed by Departments of Education across America. Denise Stalnaker, a Globaloria educator from West Virginia, addresses these questions in her recent article about student game builders in her class. This is the first in a series of articles by educators telling, in their own words, how Globaloria has impacted their own and their students’ learning. “We need to hear the voices of teachers who seek innovation, and are willing to invest their own time and effort to use new, sophisticated tools,” commented Idit Caperton. “Without them, there is a huge hole in the literature, which unfairly positions all educators as resistant to change. We initiated this series of articles to fill this gap, break this stereotype, and help emphasize that exciting change can be initiated and scaled by teachers. Change can happen from the classroom up.”


Denise learning to program games at a Globaloria training

“Experienced teachers often find it hard to change. But 21st century students need a different kind of education. Learning-by-design and project-based learning the Globaloria way has inspired and changed me as a teacher.”

3. Globaloria Impact Research Presented at AERA


Rebecca Reynolds

On April 13, 14 and 15, Idit Caperton and Rebecca Reynolds (the Foundation’s research partner from Syracuse University) presented Globaloria impact research in four sessions at the annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) in San Diego. This year’s conference theme was “Disciplined Inquiry: Education Research in the Circle of Knowledge.” For the World Wide Workshop, this was an opportunity to share our research about the power of building and producing games to enhance cognitive and emotional development, literacy practices, thinking and learning. It was also a chance to discuss the critical importance of game-media literacy with some of the top minds in the digital media and learning field – Jim Gee, Kurt Squire, Constance Steinkuehler, among others. Here are the reports our team presented at AERA.


Idit and Jim Gee talk about game-media literacy at a session lead by Elisabeth Hayes

Idit with Constance Steinkuehler
and Kurt Squire

 

 
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